*UPDATE*

I am no longer an Amazon Associate. I am currently working on updating my posts with links to various locations to buy books. One of the links I am including is to RJ Julia - this is my favorite local independent book store. You can shop their store online and have access to pretty much anything you are looking for. I do not have any affiliation with any of these sites - just looking to support my local indie book store.

Anyone looking for a new feed reader? My recommendation is Bloglovin'. I made the switch and love the layout, plus there is now an app for my phone. If you use Bloglovin' or have made the switch to another feed reader, please make sure you are following me on it so you miss none of the content here!

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Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Interview with Phil Pisani

Today I have the opportunity to welcome author Phil Pisani to The Maiden's Court!  His novel, Maggie's Wars was released in November 2013 and I had the opportunity to interview the author about his writing and the book. 

02_Maggie's Wars

From your bio, it sounds like you have always had a love of reading.  When did the love of reading turn into the desire to write?

I always admired the authors I read and marveled how they put together words to form sentences and sentences to paragraphs and ultimately into a wonderfully constructed story. I always yearned to be able to be creative like them. While studying in Italy, I began trying my hand at writing and it felt very natural and I loved it. So it was there the transformation took place - my third year in college. It was then my love of reading metamorphosed into writing.  


What was the writing process like for you? What was the most difficult part of the process? Did anything surprise you?

In the beginning I felt I was too long winded in words and couldn’t unlock my insides. It is very difficult to get within oneself and write viscerally and I think that is the challenge of any artist. Unless one writes truly or creates truly, everything becomes linear. I don’t know how it happened, it seemed more of a gradual process where I kept digging deeper to get there. Once there, the surprise came. My writing was clearer, shorter and seemed it had more strength and dimension.    


Of all the possible genres, why choose to write historical fiction?

Prior to Maggie’s Wars I wrote short stories and screenplays and was co-author of a non-fiction book, which caught the eye of a professor in an upstate New York college. He had a story to tell and wanted me to tell it but did not want his name revealed because of the sensitive matters. Since many of the events took place at the end of WWII and I wanted really to reveal these events, I felt weaving the events around fiction would be the best road to take.   


There are many, many novels set during World War II.  What would you say sets your novel apart from others within this time period?

Two things, first as mentioned earlier, the events that unfold in the story are true and really never have surfaced in any other novel or non-fiction book for that matter. In addition to this, the novel portrays a female war correspondent which is rare. Secondly, I crafted it using two different points of view, one from the female correspondent and the other from the male soldier. Collectively, I feel these two points would set it apart from other novels of that era. 


What is one interesting tidbit that didn’t make it into Maggie’s Wars that you would like to share with us?

Well, it’s not a tidbit. The publisher felt it too long so they made me cut it in two.  Eventually, Maggie goes on and reports in Korea and the beginning of Vietnam. So that will be in the sequel.


Do you have any future writing plans?  What topic or time period would you be interested in writing about?

As noted above I’m finishing up the sequel to Maggie’s Wars. I’m also doing a rewrite on my novel Sins of Liberty, about a Mexican migrant worker who finds out America isn’t what he thought it would be and struggles to return to Mexico while pursued by the authorities.

philpisani

Phil Pisani grew up on the north side of the railroad tracks in an upstate New York blue-collar industrial town in a rough neighborhood filled with the most colorful characters in the world. Factory and tannery workers mingled with bar and restaurant owners, gamblers and gangsters, good people and bad people, brash rogues and weak loudmouths, all spawned by the early immigrant movement to America. Italians, Russians, Slovacks, Irish, and Germans formed a rough and tough section of town where few from the south side dared to venture. He learned to fight at a very young age, both in the ring and on the streets. Fights became badges of honor. He also was a voracious reader. His mother worked in the village’s library. After school, or fights or sandlot football games he would curl away into the adult reading section. Enjoying the polished blonde oak bookshelves, tables and chairs, he would choose a book from the stacks and delve into its smells and contents. Reading soothed him.

He studied history and humanities in Pisa, Italy, and Oswego State in New York and later earned a MA in Political Science from Binghamton University.

He worked as a labor investigator for NY and rose in the ranks through the years but never stopped writing or reading. He currently lives in Albany NY, with his wife Joanne.

For  more information please visit Phil Pisani’s website. You can also connect with him on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Book Blurb from Maggie's Wars:

"Combatting wars on two fronts – one of fame and the other love – Maggie Hogan never wavers as a rare woman reporter on the battlefields of World War II, the Nuremburg Trials and the beginnings of the cold war. But she makes the mistake of falling for an officer, complicating her ambitions. Learn of what one woman feels she must do in order to make it in a man’s world, no matter what. Maggie’s Wars is a story about the ultimate battle between love and prestige, and how you can’t win them both."

Maggie's Wars_Tour Banner _FINAL

You can follow along with the rest of the tour by visiting the HFVBT site or on Twitter with the following hashtag: #MaggiesWarsBlogTour.

Here are some choices for purchasing the book: Amazon, B&N, RJ Julia (my fav indie bookstore).

 

 

Copyright © 2014 by The Maiden’s Court

Monday, August 18, 2014

Book Review: The Typewriter Girl by Alison Atlee

thetypewritergirl

The Typewriter Girl by Alison Atlee
Unabridged, 12 hr. 39 min.
Audible Studios
Rosalyn Landor (Narrator)
April 4, 2014
★★★½☆☆

Genre: Historical Fiction

Source: Received audiobook for review with tour with Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

“In Victorian London, there’s only so far an unmarried woman can go, and Betsey Dobson has relied on her wits and cunning to take herself as far as she can—to a position as a typewriter girl. But still, Betsey yearns for something more…so when she’s offered a position as the excursions manager at a seaside resort, she knows this is her chance for security, for independence, for an identity forged by her own work and not a man’s opinion. Underqualified for the job and on the wrong side of the aristocratic resort owner, Betsey struggles to prove herself and looks to the one person who can support her new venture: Mr. Jones, the ambitious Welshman building the resort’s pleasure fair. As she and Mr. Jones grow ever closer, Betsey begins to dream that she might finally have found her place in the world—but when her past returns to haunt her, she must fight for what she’s worked so hard…or risk losing everything.

This eloquent debut novel displays firm propriety barely restraining seething passion—a sizzling combination reminiscent of Downton Abbey.”

I am slightly ambivalent about this novel – there were some points in the novel that I really enjoyed it, and other times that frustrated me. It was and wasn’t what I expected. One of the things early on that frustrated me was the title. Betsey is only a “typewriter girl” for the first few pages of the novel. I expected that it would be a larger plot point, seeing as it is in the title. I have no problems with foul language in novels if it creates a deeper characterization or fits a situation – however, every time the f-word was used in this novel, it really made no sense at all, except to use it.

The characters were relatively well crafted. I found that I liked Mr. Jones’ story as it unfolded – I found that he was possibly the best written character and his dreams/desires/and hopes were well defined. I didn’t exactly love Betsey. She has a couple stellar moments, but the majority of the time I found her simply wishing and hoping for something better. I was ultimately (sort of) happy with the way the novel resolved itself, but I wasn’t so sure that was going to happen from the beginning.

I do love the cover though - the font used for the title is perfect for the title and the image is reminiscent of the feel of the novel.

audiobookimpressions

★★★★☆

The audiobook narration was relatively better than the story itself. Rosalyn Landor has narrated for some fantastic historical novels (including historical romance) and for some big name authors. I think that her narration did a lot to improve my appreciation of the novel. I think that if I were reading this in traditional book format, it would have taken me a lot longer to read it and I probably wouldn’t have enjoyed it as much.

This is Alison Atlee’s debut novel. You can visit Atlee’s website for additional information about the book.

Reviews of this book by other bloggers:

Here are some choices for purchasing the book: Amazon, B&N, RJ Julia (my fav indie bookstore).

atlee tour

You can follow along with the rest of the tour by visiting the HFVBT site or on Twitter with the following hashtag: #TypewriterGirlBlogTour

There is also a giveaway running tour-wide for some swag related to The Typewriter Girl.  The items include:

  • One copy of The Typewriter Girl (Audio Book or Print)
  • Set of earbuds in a cute typewriter print pouch
  • A Typewriter Girl Happily-Ever-After t-shirt (features last lines from famous novels)
  • A vintage style postcard “from” Idensea, the setting of The Typewriter Girl
  • A “dream wildly” ribbon bookmark with typewriter key charms

To enter, please complete the Rafflecopter giveaway form below. Giveaway is open to residents in the US, Canada, and the UK.

  • Giveaway ends at 11:59pm on August 29th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
  • Winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter on August 30th and notified via email (by tour organizer).
  • Winner has 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

Copyright © 2014 by The Maiden’s Court

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Interview with Deborah Hill

I have the opportunity today to welcome author Deborah Hill to The Maiden's Court.  Deborah has written a trilogy of books, based to some extent on the history of her husband's ancestors on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  The series appeals to me because the setting is not typical for historical fiction and it is set close to home.  Read on to learn more about her writing and works.

 

ThisIsTheHouse_cover-72reshouse-kingsley-merrick-deborah-hill-paperback-cover-artcover-the-heir

Your novels are based on a memoir of one of your husband’s ancestors.  Can you tell us a little bit about how this memoir inspired you to write your novels?  What about Elijah Cobb's life called out to you for the novel treatment?

I’d known about Elijah since I first walked into the family home: his portrait, done in France while he was waiting to get his indemnity money in 1794, was hanging above the mantel. You couldn’t miss it, and when I asked about it, my future mother-in-law gave me a brief introduction, down-playing his accomplishments like a good Yankee does (or, at least, did). So I didn’t think much more about it until I was married and we had two children and were living in the same town for a while. The bi-centennial was approaching, and I’d always wanted to write a book. Historical novels were my favorite – an easy way to learn history – and here was a start, already written! Of course, I couldn’t quote it, or even narrate it, because that would be boring. But if I thought of Elijah as a real person, rather than an ancestor, I could breathe life into his memoir, and if I invented him a wife, I could breathe life into HIM. And so I did.

What has been the family reception?

Believe me, I never asked!

You re-released This is the House in 2011, after an initial printing in 1975, and the others in the series then followed.  What types of things did you revise for this second printing and what led to this revision?

I suppose most authors think about the things they could have done differently, once their work is irrevocably completed. I did; I thought about it for 10 years and actually began to revise all three novels in the series 20 years ago. I “tightened” the style up, deleted as many words as I could in order to render them a little less “florid,” and made sure my history was firmly in place (which I could do because of the internet.)

You lived in the New England area while writing your books – did this factor in to your research for the novels?  What sources, besides the memoirs, were valuable to your writing?

Yes, it did. We had two small children while I was writing This is the House,  which meant that Mother (me) needed to stay close to home. Fortunately everything I needed was at hand, besides the memoir, specifically the ancient church records (which were the town records in the early days.) I wanted to pick up the little things – like the bounty on muskrat ears or blackbirds – the mill disputes – the sale of pews in the newly built meeting house. And most of all, the library where I could read and reread books on American history and the research that had been done, up to then, on the home and habits and customs of early Americans. 

The Kingland Series follows the Merrick family from Revolutionary America up through modern times.  Why write a family epic?  As the memoir you had to originally work with was set in the late 1700’s and early 1800’s, did you draw on any other family history for the later portion of the series or did you have some other sources?

Cape Cod, up until recently a remote outpost, reflected and responded to the developments of American history in microcosm, generally 50 years later than the events themselves. So it’s like a mirror, and provides a little space for the observer who can see where it’s all heading. An interesting perspective, to say the least!

My husband’s family was the perfect “vehicle” because they did things that reflected the Cape Cod microcosm without standing too far out from their contemporaries. Elijah did have a fascinating career, but he was just one of many early American mariners who did the same thing – though I don’t hear of anyone else meeting Robespierre! Kingsley’s prototype actually did start a coaching company in Australia, and while this is fairly unique, it happened far away so that when he returned home, he was just one of a number of early Victorians who were rising to great wealth. They were perfect “foils” that reflected their times. Though I invented Molly Deems, the fact was that the original Kingsley did marry his talented cousin (whom I’m sure I’ve distorted badly in order for her to reflect the constraints under which women labored in those times.)

And Augusta? And Alice? And Emily? Tim, Charles, and Steven? Bits and pieces of them are real, and most is fictional. I will discuss this in my blog, but not just yet, as The Heir wasn’t available until last March. It needs a little more time before dissection can take place.

Do you have any plans for further writing?  If so, what can you tell us?  If not, what are you doing in place of writing?

When you function as your own publicist and marketing director, a lot of your time gets absorbed. I’m loving this aspect of publishing, and am really glad I had a chance to do it, but it does limit the amount of time I have to write. I plan on blogging for a bit, which uses quite a lot of creative energy. If I do dream up another historical novel, I’ll probably post it there.

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Deborah Hill entered the world of writing at age 11, producing “Peggy’s Troubles” for her sixth grade classmates. Majoring in Creative Writing at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, she found that although she could write and loved doing it, there was, as yet, nothing to say. She needed more experience in the “real world” and so moved on to marriage and a partnership with her husband that included building houses on Cape Cod. Their children, coming home from elementary school, brought much enthusiasm for the upcoming bi-centennial, and Hill became interested in both American history and the experiences of her husband’s ancester, a mariner whose memoir described the young nation’s struggles with France and England after the Revolution. Ahah! Now there was something to write about! Hill published This is the House in 1975, The House of Kingsley Merrick in 1978, and Kingsland a few years later. Now all three will be issued under the series title Kingsland, with the third volume renamed The Heir. With the help of both computer and internet, neither of which were available 35 years ago, all three have been edited and in some cases rewritten. The memoir has been edited, too, and is available wherever This is the House is sold. The House of Kingsley Merrick will be available summer 2013 and The Heir summer of 2014.

You can find Deborah on her blog.

 

Copyright © 2014 by The Maiden’s Court

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Book Review: Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

outlander

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Book 1 in the Outlander series
Unabridged, 33 hr. 8 min.
Recorded Books
Davina Porter (Narrator)
July 13, 2006
★★★★★+

Genre: Historical Fiction; Time-Slip

Source: Downloaded the audiobook from Audible

“The year is 1945. Claire Randall, a former combat nurse, is back from the war and reunited with her husband on a second honeymoon--when she walks through a standing stone in one of the ancient stone circles that dot the British Isles. Suddenly she is a Sassenach--an "outlander"--in a Scotland torn by war and raiding Highland clans in the year of Our Lord...1743.
Hurled back in time by forces she cannot understand, Claire is catapulted into intrigues and dangers that may threaten her life...and shatter her heart. For here she meets James Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior, and becomes a woman torn between fidelity and desire...and between two vastly different men in two irreconcilable lives.”

I put off reading this book for quite some time. I had the print version on my shelf for a couple years and didn’t get any closer to reading it the more time went on. I had heard from so many people, whose reading tastes are similar to mine, that the book was amazing and I need to read it, but for some reason I never picked it up. The impetus to finally deciding to read the book, and on audiobook instead of print, was the excitement within the historical fiction community leading up to the show. I just HAD to read the book before watching the show!

I haven’t read a book this good in a little while! It has everything you could want in a novel – no wonder it is hard to classify in terms of genre! There are battle scenes, blood, and brutality. There are sensual love scenes and scintillating sexual tension. And historical nature of the period just oozing from every page. Elements of this novel could certainly appeal to both genders.

There were moments that made me cry. There were two moments where I wanted to put the book down and not pick it back up because I just didn’t want to know what happened next (although my curiosity quickly got the best of me)! There were brutal scenes of pain and despair that you could feel deep in your bones. Your emotions are wrenched every way throughout this novel. I loved and hated characters in this book at different times. That all of these emotions were possible in one book goes to show how real these characters and how true their stories felt.

The audiobook ended with a preview of book two and it was extremely hard for me not to immediately pick up book two to figure out how exactly we are where the book begins [alas I had other reading commitments first]. This will be a series that I will eagerly return to time and again.

audiobookimpressions

★★★★★+

In my relatively extensive audiobook listening experience I have only found 3 narrators who were truly perfect for their role and who I would come back and listen to again and again. Davina Porter is one of those narrators! She had the perfect voice for our Scottish and English characters; for me her accents were spot on. Her pacing was perfect – even if 33 hours is a long time to listen to one narrator! She put real emotion behind her narration and truly contributed to the feel of this book and bringing the characters to vivid life. I am thrilled to see that she is narrating all the novels in the Outlander series.

Author Diana Gabaldon also has written many other books in this series, including: Dragonfly in Amber, Voyager, Drums of Autumn, The Fiery Cross, A Breath of Snow and Ashes, An Echo in the Bone, and Written in My Own Heart’s Blood, as well as many short stories and novellas. You can visit Gabaldon’s website or blog for additional information about the book. If you would like to preview the story before reading it, why not try out this excerpt of the book?

You can also watch the trailer below to get an idea of this book:

This video is a trailer for the STARZ TV show, but season 1 will be based on the first book in the series, Outlander.

Reviews of this book by other bloggers:

Here are some choices for purchasing the book: Amazon, B&N, RJ Julia (my fav indie bookstore).

 

Copyright © 2014 by The Maiden’s Court

Friday, August 8, 2014

New Book Alert Book Blast: Lies Told in Silence by M.K. Tod

02_Lies Told in Silence Cover

Lies Told in Silence by M.K. Tod
Paperback & e-Book, 394 pages
Tod Publishing
ISBN-10: 099196702X
Publication Date: June 29, 2014
Genre: Historical Fiction

goodreads button

 

Book Blurb:

"In 1914 Paris half the city expects war while the other half scoffs at the possibility.

With knowledge gained from his role at the War Department, Henri Noisette fears that Germany may soon attack Paris. He therefore sends his wife, mother and two younger children to Beaufort, a small village in northern France. By late 1914, instead of a safe haven, Beaufort is less than twenty miles from the front.

As war unfolds, Henri’s daughter, Helene, grows up quickly and in 1917 falls in love with Edward Jamieson, a young Canadian soldier.

The novel examines love and loss, duty and sacrifice and the unexpected consequence of lies."

Here are some choices for purchasing the book: Amazon US, Amazon UK, B&N.

About the Author:

03_M.K. Tod

M.K. Tod has enjoyed a passion for historical novels that began in her early teenage years immersed in the stories of Rosemary Sutcliff, Jean Plaidy and Georgette Heyer. During her twenties, armed with Mathematics and Computer Science degrees, she embarked on a career in technology and consulting continuing to read historical fiction in the tiny snippets of time available to working women with children to raise.

In 2004, she moved to Hong Kong with her husband and no job. To keep busy Mary decided to research her grandfather’s part in the Great War. What began as an effort to understand her grandparents’ lives blossomed into a full time occupation as a writer. Her debut novel is Unraveled: Two wars, Two affairs. One Marriage. Lies Told in Silence, her second novel, is set in WWI France and tells the story of Helene Noisette who featured in Unravelled. Mary has an active blog – www.awriterofhistory.com – which discusses all aspects of historical fiction and includes author and reader interviews. Additionally, she is a book reviewer for the Historical Novel Society. Mary lives in Toronto where she is happily married with two adult children.

Connect with M.K. Tod on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Praise for Lies Told in Silence:

"Dramatically depicts the horror and heartbreak of war, while also celebrating the resilience of the human spirit." – SHARON KAY PENMAN author of A King’s Ransom

"An intricate, well-researched novel of life forever changed by WWI yet still sweet with the tender innocence of the age." – DONNA RUSSO MORIN author of The King’s Agent

"M.K. Tod is a powerful new voice in the historical fiction genre." – AMY BRUNO Historical fiction blogger at Passages to the Past

"An absorbing and rewarding historical read .. depicting the ruinous impact of war on human lives across the generations." – MARGARET EVANS PORTER author of The Proposal

"A compelling read right up to its taut page-turning ending." – RICHARD LEE founder of the Historical Novel Society

04_Lies Told in Silence_Tour & Blast Banner_FINAL

Lies Told in Silence Book Blast and Blog Tour Schedule:

Monday, July 28
Review at
Unshelfish
Review at Flashlight Commentary
Book Blast at Our Wolves Den

Tuesday, July 29
Review at
Just One More Chapter
Book Blast at Book Babe
Book Blast at A Book Geek
Book Blast at Mel’s Shelves

Wednesday, July 30
Review at
Bookish
Guest Post at Just One More Chapter
Book Blast at Passages to the Past

Thursday, July 31
Book Blast at
Royalty Free Fiction

Friday, August 1
Book Blast at
Back Porchervations
Book Blast at So Many Books, So Little Time

Saturday, August 2
Book Blast at
Mythical Books

Monday, August 4
Review & Guest Post at
A Bookish Affair
Book Blast at Historical Tapestry

Tuesday, August 5
Book Blast at
Layered Pages
Book Blast at Princess of Eboli
Book Blast at What Is That Book About

Wednesday, August 6
Book Blast at
Literary Chanteuse
Book Blast at Caroline Wilson Writes

Thursday, August 7
Review at
The Book Binder’s Daughter
Book Blast at Kinx’s Book Nook

Friday, August 8
Book Blast at
The Maiden’s Court

Monday, August 11
Review at
Dianne Ascroft Blog
Book Blast at Svetlana’s Reads and Views

Tuesday, August 12
Book Blast at
Book Nerd
Book Blast at The Bookworm

Wednesday, August 13
Review at
The Writing Desk

Thursday, August 14
Book Blast at
Words and Peace
Book Blast at CelticLady’s Reviews

Friday, August 15
Review at
Lost in Books
Book Blast at The Mad Reviewer

Sunday, August 17
Book Blast at
Brooke Blogs

Monday, August 18
Review at
The Librarian Fatale
Review at Historical Fiction Notebook

Tour Wide Giveaway:

To win a copy of M.K. Tod’s Lies Told In Silence please complete the Rafflecopter giveaway form below. Giveaway is open internationally!

  • Giveaway ends at 11:59pm on August 18th. You must be 18 or older to enter.
  • Winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter on August 19th and notified via email.
  • Winner have 48 hours to claim prize or new winner is chosen.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

Copyright © 2014 by The Maiden’s Court

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Book Review: The Summer Queen by Elizabeth Chadwick

the-summer-queen

The Summer Queen by Elizabeth Chadwick
Book 1 in Eleanor of Aquitaine Trilogy
ARC, eBook, 497 pages
Sourcebooks Landmark
July 1, 2014
★★★★ ½☆

Genre: Historical fiction

Source: Received for review via Netgalley

“Eleanor of Aquitaine is a 12th century icon who has fascinated readers for 800 years. But the real Eleanor remains elusive.
This stunning novel introduces an Eleanor that all other writers have missed. Based on the most up-to-date research, it is the first novel to show Eleanor beginning her married life at 13.
Overflowing with scandal, passion, triumph and tragedy, Eleanor's legendary story begins when her beloved father dies in the summer of 1137, and she is made to marry the young prince Louis of France. A week after the marriage she becomes a queen and her life will change beyond recognition . . .”

The Summer Queen is the first in a planned trilogy by Elizabeth Chadwick featuring Eleanor (or Alienor) of Aquitaine. This novel focuses on her younger years, time as Queen of France while married to King Louis, and the earliest years of her marriage to Henry, Duke of Normandy. I have read a novel or two that also focus primarily on this time period, however, Chadwick brings a new interpretation and life to Alienor.

As Chadwick chooses to call her main character by Alienor, I will here too. For me, it helped to separate this character from the one I have read in other novels, so it allowed for a fresh interpretation. Alienor was strong, crafty, and determined to make the best out of bad situations. Anyone who could put up with the man that King Louis became deserves just a little bit of credit. This part of her life is a prime example of sometimes money/fame/being queen isn’t everything if all the other parts of your life are miserable.

I think that Chadwick did a fantastic job of presenting Alienor in a realistic light. There are a great many myths and stories that surround her and Chadwick makes choices, filling in the historical blanks, that make the most sense with her interpretation of the historical record. At no point did Alienor feel out of place or stepping beyond her role, as some authors have made her do. She was a real woman living and breathing in her time.

Speaking of living and breathing, the world that these characters live in utterly came to life within the pages. One of Chadwick’s strengths is that she brings the historical world that we will never experience to life in a way that is relatable to us in the modern day.

While the William Marshal novels will also be my Chadwick novels of choice, I have faith that the Eleanor of Aquitaine trilogy will be right up there, because The Summer Queen was a great start!

Author Elizabeth Chadwick also has written many other books, too many to list really. Here is the complete list.  You can visit Chadwick’s website or one of her blogs for additional information about the books.

For another take on The Summer Queen, check out this music list compiled by the author.

My reviews of other books by this author:

Reviews of this book by other bloggers:

Here are some choices for purchasing the book: Amazon, B&N, RJ Julia (my fav indie bookstore).

 

Copyright © 2014 by The Maiden’s Court

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Outlander: The TV Series

outlander_starz

The TV series based on Diana Gabaldon's novel of the same name, Outlander, officially premieres this coming Saturday.  I'm racing to finish the book before Saturday - I'm listening to the audiobook production as I write this post.  The book is great, but the audio production is amazing!  I'm a recent convert to the book series.  I have had Outlander on my book shelf for probably 2 years now.  I had heard over and over again from fellow bloggers about how great the book was and how I needed to read it - but I just never got around to it.  When I heard the show was coming out, I now had the impetus to get the book read - because I'm one of those who can't watch a show or movie without having read the book first. 

Starz has already posted the premiere episode on their website - available to all, not just subscribers.  I will be waiting for Saturday (so I can finish the book).  Here is the link to watch the premiere if you want to see it.   I have read mixed reviews of the show thus far.  I have enjoyed the historical productions that Starz has put on thus far, so I am interested in this one.  You can check out the Outlander Starz website for information on the casting etc.

Have you watched the premiere already?  What did you think?  Are you excited to watch the series? 

 

Copyright © 2014 by The Maiden’s Court